Home / Publications / Scientific publications / Scientific Papers 2008 / Presumptive tremorgenic mycotoxicosis in a dog in New Zealand, after eating mouldy walnuts

Presumptive tremorgenic mycotoxicosis in a dog in New Zealand, after eating mouldy walnuts

Presumptive tremorgenic mycotoxicosis in a dog in New Zealand, after eating mouldy walnuts. Munday JS, Thompson D, Finch SC, Babu JV, Wilkins AL, di Menna ME, Miles CO. New Zealand Veterinary Journal 2008;56(3):145–8

CASE HISTORY:

A 1-year-old, intact male Labrador-cross dog vomited after eating walnuts that had been on the ground for 5 months. The dog then developed tremors, ataxia, increased salivation, and hyperaesthesia.

CLINICAL FINDINGS:

The dog had marked generalised tremors, ataxia and a temperature of 39.9 degrees C. Both pupils were of normal size and normally responsive to light. Vomiting was induced, and walnut shell was visible in the vomitus.

DIAGNOSIS:

Due to the sudden onset of tremors, lack of exposure to other convulsive toxins, and the evidence of ingestion of walnuts, the provisional diagnosis was tremorgenic mycotoxicosis. The dog was treated symptomatically, and made a full recovery over 18 hours. Tremorgenic mycotoxins were detected within walnuts collected from the dog's environment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Fungi that produce tremorgenic mycotoxins are present in New Zealand. Intoxication should be suspected in dogs that suddenly develop muscle tremors, especially if there is a history of ingestion of mouldy food 2-3 hours prior to the development of tremors.

NVI authors

Wilkins Alistair

Gjesteforsker